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Doravirine: A Return of the NNRTI Class?

Authors
  • Blevins, Sarah R1
  • Hester, E Kelly2
  • Chastain, Daniel B3
  • Cluck, David B4
  • 1 Chase Brexton Healthcare, Baltimore, MD, USA.
  • 2 Auburn University Harrison School of Pharmacy, Auburn, AL, USA.
  • 3 University of Georgia College of Pharmacy, Albany, GA, USA. , (Georgia)
  • 4 East Tennessee State University Gatton College of Pharmacy, Johnson City, TN, USA.
Type
Published Article
Journal
Annals of Pharmacotherapy
Publisher
SAGE Publications
Publication Date
Jan 01, 2020
Volume
54
Issue
1
Pages
64–74
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1177/1060028019869641
PMID: 31416335
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Objective: To compare and contrast doravirine (DOR) with other agents in the nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) class, review safety and efficacy data from both completed and ongoing clinical trials, and outline the potential place in therapy of DOR. Data Sources: A literature search using the PubMed database (inception to June 2019) was conducted using the search terms HIV, doravirine, non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor, NNRTI, and MK-1439. Study Selection and Data Extraction: Clinical data were limited to those published in the English language from phase 2 or 3 clinical trials. Ongoing trials were identified through ClinicalTrials.gov. Data Synthesis: DOR was approved by the US Food and Drug Administration on the strength of 2 phase 3 randomized, double-blind, noninferiority clinical trials with additional studies currently underway examining its utility in other clinical scenarios. Relevance to Patient Care and Clinical Practice: The role of NNRTIs as part of antiretroviral (ARV) therapy has diminished in recent years given the introduction of more tolerable individual ARV agents and regimens. Despite this, new agents are still needed in the therapeutic arena because treatment failure as well as intolerance can still occur with many first-line therapies. The optimal place in therapy of DOR remains to be defined. Conclusions: DOR is a new NNRTI that represents a potential treatment option for treatment-naïve patients, without many of the previously described untoward effects of the NNRTI class.

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