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Dopaminergic Modulation of Goal-Directed Behavior in a Rodent Model of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder.

Authors
  • Natsheh, Joman Y1, 2, 3, 4
  • Shiflett, Michael W5
  • 1 Center for Molecular and Behavioral Neuroscience, Rutgers University, Newark, NJ, United States. , (United States)
  • 2 Kessler Foundation, East Hanover, NJ, United States. , (United States)
  • 3 Palestinian Neuroscience Initiative, Al-Quds University, East Jerusalem, Palestine. , (Palestinian Territories)
  • 4 Children's Specialized Hospital Research Center, New Brunswick, NJ, United States. , (United States)
  • 5 Department of Psychology, Rutgers University, Newark, NJ, United States. , (United States)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Frontiers in Integrative Neuroscience
Publisher
Frontiers Media SA
Publication Date
Jan 01, 2018
Volume
12
Pages
45–45
Identifiers
DOI: 10.3389/fnint.2018.00045
PMID: 30344481
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Aside from its clinical symptoms of inattention, impulsivity and hyperactivity, patients with Attention/Deficit-Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) display reward and motivational impairments. These impairments may reflect a deficit in action control, that is, an inability to flexibly adapt behavior to changing consequences. We previously showed that spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR), an inbred rodent model of ADHD, show impairments in goal-directed action control, and instead are predominated by habits. In this study, we examined the effects of specific dopamine receptor sub-type (D1 and D2) agonists and antagonists on goal-directed behavior in SHR and the normotensive inbred control strain Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats. Rats acquired an instrumental response for different-flavored food rewards. A selective-satiety outcome devaluation procedure followed by a choice test in extinction revealed outcome-insensitive habitual behavior in SHR rats. Outcome-sensitive goal-directed behavior was restored in SHR rats following injection prior to the choice test of the dopamine D2 receptor agonist Quinpirole or dopamine D1 receptor antagonist SCH23390, whereas WKY rats showed habitual responding following exposure to these drugs. This novel finding indicates that the core behavioral deficit in ADHD might not be a consequence of dopamine hypofunction, but rather is due to a misbalance between activation of dopamine D1 and D2 receptor pathways that govern action control.

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