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Does Oxygen Uptake Before Physical Exercise Affect Tear Osmolarity?

Authors
  • Wylęgała, Adam1, 2
  • Pilch, Jan3
  • Bolek, Bartłomiej1, 2
  • Sędziak-Marcinek, Bogumiła1, 2
  • Wylęgała, Edward1, 2
  • 1 Ophthalmology Department, Railway Hospital, Poland , (Poland)
  • 2 II School of Medicine with the Division of Dentistry in Zabrze Medical University of Silesia, Poland , (Poland)
  • 3 Chair of Physiological-Medical Sciences. The Jerzy Kukuczka Academy of Physical Education in Katowice, Poland , (Poland)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Journal of Human Kinetics
Publisher
Sciendo
Publication Date
Jul 21, 2020
Volume
73
Issue
1
Pages
297–304
Identifiers
DOI: 10.2478/hukin-2019-0118
Source
De Gruyter
Keywords
License
Green

Abstract

Recently, it has been reported that tear osmolarity (Tosm) is correlated with plasma osmolarity and will increase during exertion. We aimed to assess whether inhaling oxygen-enriched air between exercises could significantly change the Tosm value. Thirty men aged 24.9 years were included in the study. A cycloergometer was used to perform the exercise protocol. We recorded the participants’ Tosm (mOsm/L), heart rate (HR, beats/minute), oxygen saturation, and blood pressure values. After the first exhaustive exercise (T1), participants inhaled oxygen in the experimental group and a placebo in the control group. After the second exercise (T2), another set of measurements was obtained. The Tosm value before exercise was 297.4 ± 1.21 and 296.53 ± 1.11 mOsm/L (p = 0.61718) and the HR was 72.6 ± 2.59 and 73 ± 2.59 beats/minute (p = 0.39949) in the study and the control group, respectively. At T1, Tosm was 303.67 ± 1.25 and 302.2 ± 1.25 mOsm/L (p = 0.41286) and the HR reached 178.04 ± 2.60 and 176.4 ± 2.60 beats/minute (p = 0.65832), respectively. At T2, Tosm in the study group reached 305.73 ± 0.86 mOsm/L (correlation with the use of oxygen: r = −0.3818), and in the control group, it was 308.4 ± 0.86 mOsm/L (p = 0.0373), while the HR reached 172.20 ± 2.53 beats/minute in the study group and 178.2 ± 2.53 beats/minute in the control group (p = 0.057). It was concluded that inhaling oxygen before and after exercise could increase the rate of recovery after exhaustive exercise.

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