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Does maternal separation accelerate maturation of perineuronal nets and parvalbumin-containing inhibitory interneurons in male and female rats?

Authors
  • Richardson, Rick1
  • Bowers, Jeremy2
  • Callaghan, Bridget L3
  • Baker, Kathryn D2
  • 1 School of Psychology, UNSW Sydney, NSW, 2052, Australia. Electronic address: [email protected]. , (Australia)
  • 2 School of Psychology, UNSW Sydney, NSW, 2052, Australia. , (Australia)
  • 3 Department of Psychology, University of California - Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, United States. , (United States)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Developmental cognitive neuroscience
Publication Date
Feb 01, 2021
Volume
47
Pages
100905–100905
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/j.dcn.2020.100905
PMID: 33385787
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Early life adversity impacts on a range of emotional, cognitive, and psychological processes. A recent theoretical model suggests that at least some of these effects are due to accelerated maturation of specific physiological systems and/or neural circuits. For example, maternal separation (MS), a model of early life adversity in rodents, accelerates maturation of memory systems, and here we examined its impact on maturation of perineuronal nets (PNNs) and parvalbumin (PV)-containing inhibitory interneurons. PNNs are specialized extracellular matrix structures suggested to be involved in stabilizing long-term memories and in the closure of a sensitive period in memory development. PV-containing inhibitory interneurons are the type of cell that PNNs preferentially surround, and are also thought to be involved in memory. In Experiment 1, with male rats, there was an increase in PNNs in both the amygdala and prefrontal cortex with age from infancy to juvenility. Contrary to prediction, MS had no impact on either PNN or PV expression. The same pattern was observed in female rats in Experiment 2. Taken together, these data show that the early maturation of memory in MS infants is not due to an accelerated maturation of PNNs or PV-containing cells in either the amygdala or prefrontal cortex. Copyright © 2021 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

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