Affordable Access

deepdyve-link
Publisher Website

Does internalized racism matter in HIV risk? Correlates of biomedical HIV prevention interventions among Black men who have sex with men in the United States.

Authors
  • Whitfield, Darren L1
  • 1 School of Social Work, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, USA.
Type
Published Article
Journal
AIDS care
Publication Date
Sep 01, 2020
Volume
32
Issue
9
Pages
1116–1124
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1080/09540121.2020.1753007
PMID: 32279540
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Black men who have sex with men (MSM) account for 26% of all new HIV infections in the United States. Biomedical HIV interventions have proven to reduce HIV infections however the use of these interventions by Black MSM is inconsistent. Research suggests that internalized racism may contribute to inconsistent biomedical HIV interventions (condom use and PrEP use) among Black MSM. Using a national sample of 432 Black MSM, we examined the relationship between condom and PrEP use and internalized racism. The results suggest there is some evidence for an association between internalized racism and PrEP use. In addition, internalized racism was not associated with condom use for both insertive and receptive anal sex among Black MSM. These finding suggest the relationship between internalized racism and HIV prevention strategies is not facile and more attention is needed to understand the true impact of racism, both internal and societal, on HIV prevention strategies among Black MSM. These findings underscore the nature of racism in the daily lives of Black MSM and how it impacts HIV prevention strategies adopted by these men.

Report this publication

Statistics

Seen <100 times