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Does direct farm marketing fulfill its promises? analyzing job satisfaction among direct-market farmers in Canada

Authors
  • Azima, Stevens
  • Mundler, Patrick
Type
Published Article
Journal
Agriculture and Human Values
Publisher
Springer Netherlands
Publication Date
Jan 31, 2022
Volume
39
Issue
2
Pages
791–807
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1007/s10460-021-10289-9
PMID: 35600981
PMCID: PMC9114070
Source
PubMed Central
Keywords
Disciplines
  • Article
License
Unknown

Abstract

Short food supply chains have become the focus of considerable research in the last two decades. However, studies so far remain highly localized, and claims about the economic and social advantages of such channels for farmers are not backed by large-scale empirical evidence. Using a web survey of 613 direct-market farmers across Canada, this article explores the potential economic and social benefits that farmers derive from participating in short food supply chains. We used multivariate analysis to test whether a farmer’s degree of involvement in direct food channels is positively correlated with levels of work enjoyment, social satisfaction, and economic satisfaction. The results indicate that, overall, direct-market farmers report high levels of occupational satisfaction, although work-related challenges persist, such as stress, excessive workloads, and competition. Farmer participation in short food chains was also a positive predictor of work enjoyment and economic satisfaction, but not of social satisfaction, as measured by the share of total farm sales attributable to direct selling. Net annual farm revenue, the share of direct food sales involving a middleman, age, and gender also correlated with one or more dimensions of occupational satisfaction.

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