Affordable Access

Does atrial fibrillation cause false-positive late potentials?

Authors
Type
Published Article
Journal
Pacing and clinical electrophysiology : PACE
Publication Date
Volume
16
Issue
12
Pages
2222–2226
Identifiers
PMID: 7508598
Source
Medline

Abstract

We hypothesized that atrial fibrillation may cause false-positive late potentials due to the recording of baseline atrial activity. We performed signal-averaged ECGs in 26 patients with atrial fibrillation before and after conversion to normal sinus rhythm. Signal-averaged ECGs were recorded for > 200 cycles with a noise level of < or = 0.5 microV. The signals were band-pass filtered at 40-250 Hz. We examined filtered QRS duration (fQRS), duration of low amplitude signal < 40 microV (LAS), and the root mean square (RMS) of the terminal 40 msec of the QRS complex. A late potential was considered present when two of the following three criteria were met: fQRS > or = 114 msec, LAS > or = 38 msec, and RMS < or = 20 microV. The mean +/- standard deviation of the fQRS in atrial fibrillation and sinus rhythm were 113 +/- 28 and 110 +/- 25 msec; of the LAS 38 +/- 17 and 37 +/- 15 msec; of the RMS 27 +/- 22 and 28 +/- 21 microV; of the noise 0.25 +/- 0.08 and 0.22 +/- 0.07 microV (P = NS). Ten signal-averaged ECGs in atrial fibrillation had late potentials. With reversion to sinus rhythm one of these 26 patients gained a late potential; two others lost a late potential (P = NS by McNemar's Chi-square). There was no significant difference in the signal-averaged ECG parameters or noise levels. In conclusion, signal-averaged ECG parameters are not significantly changed by cardioversion of atrial fibrillation to normal sinus rhythm.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

There are no comments yet on this publication. Be the first to share your thoughts.

Statistics

Seen <100 times
0 Comments