Affordable Access

deepdyve-link
Publisher Website

Do Refined Grains Have a Place in a Healthy Dietary Pattern: Perspectives from an Expert Panel Consensus Meeting.

Authors
  • Papanikolaou, Yanni1
  • Slavin, Joanne L2
  • Clemens, Roger3
  • Brenna, J Thomas4
  • Hayes, Dayle5
  • Gaesser, Glenn A6
  • Fulgoni, Victor L 3rd7
  • 1 Nutritional Strategies, Paris, Canada. , (Canada)
  • 2 Department of Food Science and Nutrition, University of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN, USA.
  • 3 USC School of Pharmacy, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, USA.
  • 4 Department of Pediatrics, Dell Medical School, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX, USA.
  • 5 Nutrition for the Future, Bozeman, MT, USA.
  • 6 College of Health Solutions, Arizona State University, Phoenix, AZ, USA.
  • 7 Nutrition Impact, Battle Creek, MI, USA.
Type
Published Article
Journal
Current developments in nutrition
Publication Date
Oct 01, 2020
Volume
4
Issue
10
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1093/cdn/nzaa125
PMID: 33062912
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Although dietary guidance recommends increasing consumption of whole grains and concurrently limiting consumption of refined and/or enriched grain foods, emerging research suggests that certain refined grains may be part of a healthy dietary pattern. A scientific expert panel was convened to review published data since the release of 2015 dietary guidance in defined areas of grain research, which included nutrient intakes, diet quality, enrichment/fortification, and associations with weight-related outcomes. Based on a 1-d roundtable discussion, the expert panel reached consensus that 1) whole grains and refined grains can make meaningful nutrient contributions to dietary patterns, 2) whole and refined grain foods contribute nutrient density, 3) fortification and enrichment of grains remain vital in delivering nutrient adequacy in the American diet, 4) there is inconclusive scientific evidence that refined grain foods are linked to overweight and obesity, and 5) gaps exist in the scientific literature with regard to grain foods and health. © The Author(s) 2020. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of American Society for Nutrition.

Report this publication

Statistics

Seen <100 times