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Do Multiple Forms of Social Capital Mediate the Relationship Between Parental Violence and Children's Maladaptive Behaviors?

Authors
  • Kim, Sangwon1, 2
  • Lee, Yanghee2
  • 1 International Child Rights Center, Seoul, Republic of Korea. , (North Korea)
  • 2 Sungkyunkwan University, Seoul, Republic of Korea. , (North Korea)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Journal of interpersonal violence
Publication Date
Mar 01, 2021
Volume
36
Issue
5-6
Pages
2592–2611
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1177/0886260518760009
PMID: 29528800
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Many things can harm children's well-being. Among them, exposure to parental violence makes children vulnerable and often leads to aggression and/or depression. However, not all children who have suffered parental violence show aggressive behavior or depressive mood. Social capital, defined as resources accruing from interpersonal relationships, was proposed to significantly mediate the relationships among adverse experiences and their negative impacts. In previous studies, social capital accrued from parents played a positive role for children in violent situations, but children exposed to parental violence need alternative sources of social capital. This study targeted fourth-grade Korean children and aimed to identify and test the role of various forms of social capital to help children overcome negative consequences from parental violence. Siblings, friends, teachers, neighbors, and online acquaintances were sources of social capital, and the results showed that social capital from siblings, teachers, neighbors, or online acquaintances mediated in the relationships between parental violence and aggressive behavior. In addition, social capital from siblings and online acquaintances mediated in the relationships between parental violence and depressive mood. The findings have implications in terms of intervention. It is suggested that multiple forms of social capital from children's immediate environments are helpful in their adaptation from exposure to parental violence, and thus, relationship-based interventions are recommended.

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