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Do malignant cells sleep at night?

Authors
  • Cortés-Hernández, Luis Enrique1
  • Eslami-S, Zahra1
  • Dujon, Antoine M.2, 3
  • Giraudeau, Mathieu2
  • Ujvari, Beata3, 4
  • Thomas, Frédéric2
  • Alix-Panabières, Catherine1, 2, 5
  • 1 University Medical Centre of Montpellier, Montpellier, France , Montpellier (France)
  • 2 IRD 224–CNRS 5290–Université de Montpellier, Montpellier, France , Montpellier (France)
  • 3 Deakin University, Waurn Ponds, Victoria, Australia , Waurn Ponds (Australia)
  • 4 University of Tasmania, Hobart, Tasmania, Australia , Hobart (Australia)
  • 5 Institut Universitaire de Recherche Clinique (IURC), 641, avenue du Doyen Gaston Giraud, Montpellier Cedex 5, 34093, France , Montpellier Cedex 5 (France)
Type
Published Article
Publication Date
Nov 12, 2020
Volume
21
Issue
1
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1186/s13059-020-02179-w
Source
Springer Nature
Keywords
License
Green

Abstract

Biological rhythms regulate the biology of most, if not all living creatures, from whole organisms to their constitutive cells, their microbiota, and also parasites. Here, we present the hypothesis that internal and external ecological variations induced by biological cycles also influence or are exploited by cancer cells, especially by circulating tumor cells, the key players in the metastatic cascade. We then discuss the possible clinical implications of the effect of biological cycles on cancer progression, and how they could be exploited to improve and standardize methods used in the liquid biopsy field.

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