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Do gender and race/ethnicity influence acute myocardial infarction quality of care in a hospital with a large Hispanic patient and provider representation?

Authors
Type
Published Article
Journal
Cardiology Research and Practice
2090-0597
Publisher
Hindawi Limited
Publication Date
Volume
2013
Pages
975393–975393
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1155/2013/975393
PMID: 24490100
Source
Medline

Abstract

Background. Disparities in acute myocardial infarction (AMI) care for women and minorities have been extensively reported in United States but with limited information on Hispanics. Methods. Medical records of 287 (62%) Hispanic and 176 (38%) non-Hispanic white (NHW) patients and 245 women (53%) admitted with suspected AMI to a southern California nonprofit community hospital with a large Hispanic patient and provider representation were reviewed. Baseline characteristics, outcomes (mortality, CATH, PCI, CABG, and use of pertinent drug therapy), and medical insurance were analyzed according to gender, Hispanic and NHW race/ethnicity when AMI was confirmed. For categorical variables, 2 × 2 chi-square analysis was conducted. Odds ratio and 95% confidence interval for outcomes adjusted for gender, race/ethnicity, cardiovascular risk factors, and insurance were obtained. Results. Women and Hispanics had similar drug therapy, CATH, PCI, and mortality as men and NHW when AMI was confirmed (n = 387). Hispanics had less private insurance than NHW (31.4% versus 56.3%, P < 0.001); no significant differences were found according to gender. Conclusions. No differences in quality measures and outcomes were found for women and between Hispanic and NHW in AMI patients admitted to a facility with a large Hispanic representation. Disparities in medical insurance showed no influence on these findings.

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