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DNA methylation clocks for clawed frogs reveal evolutionary conservation of epigenetic aging.

Authors
  • Zoller, Joseph A1
  • Parasyraki, Eleftheria2
  • Lu, Ake T3, 4
  • Haghani, Amin3, 4
  • Niehrs, Christof5, 6
  • Horvath, Steve7, 8, 9
  • 1 Department of Biostatistics, School of Public Health, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, USA.
  • 2 Institute of Molecular Biology (IMB), Mainz, Germany. , (Germany)
  • 3 Department of Human Genetics, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, USA.
  • 4 Altos Labs, San Diego, CA, USA.
  • 5 Institute of Molecular Biology (IMB), Mainz, Germany. [email protected]. , (Germany)
  • 6 German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Division of Molecular Embryology, DKFZ-ZMBH Alliance, Heidelberg, Germany. [email protected]. , (Germany)
  • 7 Department of Biostatistics, School of Public Health, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, USA. [email protected].
  • 8 Department of Human Genetics, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, USA. [email protected].
  • 9 Altos Labs, San Diego, CA, USA. [email protected].
Type
Published Article
Journal
GeroScience
Publication Date
Feb 01, 2024
Volume
46
Issue
1
Pages
945–960
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1007/s11357-023-00840-3
PMID: 37270437
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

To address how conserved DNA methylation-based epigenetic aging is in diverse branches of the tree of life, we generated DNA methylation data from African clawed frogs (Xenopus laevis) and Western clawed frogs (Xenopus tropicalis) and built multiple epigenetic clocks. Dual species clocks were developed that apply to both humans and frogs (human-clawed frog clocks), supporting that epigenetic aging processes are evolutionary conserved outside mammals. Highly conserved positively age-related CpGs are located in neural-developmental genes such as uncx, tfap2d as well as nr4a2 implicated in age-associated disease. We conclude that signatures of epigenetic aging are evolutionary conserved between frogs and mammals and that the associated genes relate to neural processes, altogether opening opportunities to employ Xenopus as a model organism to study aging. © 2023. The Author(s).

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