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DNA double-strand breaks of human peripheral blood lymphocyte induced by CT examination of oral and maxillofacial region.

Authors
  • Yang, Pan1
  • Wang, Shuo1
  • Liu, Denggao1
  • Zhao, Hua2
  • Li, Gang3
  • 1 Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, Peking University School and Hospital of Stomatology & National Engineering Laboratory for Digital and Material Technology of Stomatology & Beijing Key Laboratory of Digital Stomatology, #22 Zhongguancun Nandajie, Hai Dian District, Beijing, 100081, China. , (China)
  • 2 China CDC Key Laboratory of Radiological Protection and Nuclear Emergency, National Institute for Radiological Protection, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Beijing, 100088, People's Republic of China. , (China)
  • 3 Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, Peking University School and Hospital of Stomatology & National Engineering Laboratory for Digital and Material Technology of Stomatology & Beijing Key Laboratory of Digital Stomatology, #22 Zhongguancun Nandajie, Hai Dian District, Beijing, 100081, China. [email protected] , (China)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Clinical Oral Investigations
Publisher
Springer-Verlag
Publication Date
Dec 01, 2020
Volume
24
Issue
12
Pages
4617–4624
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1007/s00784-020-03331-3
PMID: 32424460
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

To explore whether a computed tomography (CT) examination of the head and neck region induces biological damage and whether the damage was correlated with the radiation dose. Peripheral blood was taken from 33 individuals who received head and neck CT examinations. Blood samples were divided into three groups: the control group and the in vivo and in vitro irradiation groups. The number of DNA double-strand breaks was estimated by comparing the changes in the rates of γ-H2AX foci formation in the peripheral blood before and after CT examination. The absorbed dose and effective dose were calculated with the software VirtualDose based on the Monte Carlo method, and the absorbed doses in blood were estimated accordingly. The γ-H2AX foci rates were increased in the in vivo (p < 0.001) and in vitro irradiation groups (p < 0.001) after CT examination when compared with those in the control group. The rate of γ-H2AX foci formation showed linear dose-responses for the CT dose index volume (CTDIvol), dose-length product (DLP), and blood dose after CT examination. A CT examination of the head and neck region provides a high enough radiation dose to induce DNA double-strand breaks in cells in the peripheral blood. There was a linear correlation between the formation of DNA double-strand breaks and radiation doses after CT examination. In addition to ensuring image quality, in a real clinical situation, the scanning area should be strictly administered, and repeated operations should be avoided to minimise the patient's radiation dose.

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