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Diversity of IncP-9 plasmids of Pseudomonas.

Authors
  • Sevastsyanovich, Yanina R1
  • Krasowiak, Renata1
  • Bingle, Lewis E H1
  • Haines, Anthony S1
  • Sokolov, Sergey L2
  • Kosheleva, Irina A2
  • Leuchuk, Anastassia A3
  • Titok, Marina A3
  • Smalla, Kornelia4
  • Thomas, Christopher M1
  • 1 School of Biosciences, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT, UK.
  • 2 Skryabin Institute of Biochemistry and Physiology of Microorganisms, Russian Academy of Sciences, Pushchino 142290, Russia.
  • 3 Genetics Department, Biology Faculty, Belarus State University, 6 Kurchatova St, Minsk 220064, Belarus. , (Belarus)
  • 4 Julius Kühn Institute - Federal Research Centre for Cultivated Plants (JKI), Messeweg 11/12, 38104 Braunschweig, Germany. , (Germany)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Microbiology (Reading, England)
Publication Date
Oct 01, 2008
Volume
154
Issue
Pt 10
Pages
2929–2941
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1099/mic.0.2008/017939-0
PMID: 18832300
Source
Medline
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

IncP-9 plasmids are important vehicles for degradation and resistance genes that contribute to the adaptability of Pseudomonas species in a variety of natural habitats. The three completely sequenced IncP-9 plasmids, pWW0, pDTG1 and NAH7, show extensive homology in replication, partitioning and transfer loci (an approximately 25 kb region) and to a lesser extent in the remaining backbone segments. We used PCR, DNA sequencing, hybridization and phylogenetic analyses to investigate the genetic diversity of 30 IncP-9 plasmids as well as the possibility of recombination between plasmids belonging to this family. Phylogenetic analysis of rep and oriV sequences revealed nine plasmid subgroups with 7-35 % divergence between them. Only one phenotypic character was normally associated with each subgroup, except for the IncP-9beta cluster, which included naphthalene- and toluene-degradation plasmids. The PCR and hybridization analysis using pWW0- and pDTG1-specific primers and probes targeting selected backbone loci showed that members of different IncP-9 subgroups have considerable similarity in their overall organization, supporting the existence of a conserved ancestral IncP-9 sequence. The results suggested that some IncP-9 plasmids are the product of recombination between plasmids of different IncP-9 subgroups but demonstrated clearly that insertion of degradative transposons has occurred on multiple occasions, indicating that association of this phenotype with these plasmids is not simply the result of divergent evolution from a single successful ancestral degradative plasmid.

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