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Dissociation of adrenal androgen and cortisol levels in acute stress.

Authors
  • Parker, L
  • Eugene, J
  • Farber, D
  • Lifrak, E
  • Lai, M
  • Juler, G
Type
Published Article
Journal
Hormone and metabolic research = Hormon- und Stoffwechselforschung = Hormones et métabolisme
Publication Date
Apr 01, 1985
Volume
17
Issue
4
Pages
209–212
Identifiers
PMID: 2989140
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

Patients recovering from acute surgical stress often excrete increased 17-OH corticosteroids with no change in 17-ketosteroids. The explanation for these findings is unclear. In order to investigate possible divergence between cortisol and adrenal androgen metabolism in acute stress, repeated morning cortisol and dehydroepiandrosterone (DHA) measurements were made in patients undergoing ACTH stimulation 48 to 96 hours preoperatively, followed by determinations before and during major surgery, also performed in the morning. Cortisol and DHA are largely metabolized by the liver, so liver blood flow under a constant general anesthetic regimen known not to affect cortisol metabolism was monitored by pre- and intraoperative indocyanine green dye clearance. Results indicated no difference between the cortisol and DHA stimulation resulting from two hours of ACTH stimulation or major surgery, and a small (14.4%) decline in hepatic blood flow during general anesthesia. However, while DHA concentrations remained constant immediately preceding surgery, cortisol concentrations increased by 61% (P less than 0.05). Previous studies have also demonstrated increased concentrations of cortisol before surgical procedures, presumably due to psychological stress. However, this is the first demonstration of a dissociation between concentrations of cortisol and an adrenal androgen due to psychological stress.

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