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Dissociable Contribution of Extrastriate Responses to Representational Enhancement of Gaze Targets.

Authors
  • Merrikhi, Yaser1
  • Shams-Ahmar, Mohammad2, 3
  • Karimi-Rouzbahani, Hamid3, 4, 5
  • Clark, Kelsey6
  • Ebrahimpour, Reza2, 7
  • Noudoost, Behrad6
  • 1 Department of Physiology, McGill University, Montréal, Canada. , (Canada)
  • 2 School of Cognitive Sciences, Institute for Research in Fundamental Sciences (IPM), Tehran, Iran. , (Iran)
  • 3 Department of Cognitive Neurology, Hertie Institute for Clinical Brain Research, University of Tübingen, Germany. , (Germany)
  • 4 Perception in Action Research Centre, Department of Cognitive Science, Macquarie University, Australia. , (Australia)
  • 5 Medical Research Council Cognition and Brain Sciences Unit, University of Cambridge, UK.
  • 6 Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah.
  • 7 Faculty of Computer Engineering, Shahid Rajaee Teacher Training University, Tehran, Iran. , (Iran)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience
Publisher
MIT Press
Publication Date
Aug 18, 2021
Pages
1–14
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1162/jocn_a_01750
PMID: 34407189
Source
Medline
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Before saccadic eye movements, our perception of the saccade targets is enhanced. Changes in the visual representation of saccade targets, which presumably underlie this perceptual benefit, emerge even before the eye begins to move. This perisaccadic enhancement has been shown to involve changes in the response magnitude, selectivity, and reliability of visual neurons. In this study, we quantified multiple aspects of perisaccadic changes in the neural response, including gain, feature tuning, contrast response function, reliability, and correlated activity between neurons. We then assessed the contributions of these various perisaccadic modulations to the population's enhanced perisaccadic representation of saccade targets. We found a partial dissociation between the motor information, carried entirely by gain changes, and visual information, which depended on all three types of modulation. These findings expand our understanding of the perisaccadic enhancement of visual representations and further support the existence of multiple sources of motor modulation and visual enhancement within extrastriate visual cortex. © 2021 Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

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