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Disruption of latent inhibition by interpolation of task-irrelevant stimulation between preexposure and conditioning.

Authors
  • Escobar, Martha
  • Arcediano, Francisco
  • Miller, Ralph R
Type
Published Article
Journal
Learning & behavior
Publication Date
Aug 01, 2005
Volume
33
Issue
3
Pages
371–385
Identifiers
PMID: 16396083
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

Latent inhibition refers to attenuated responding to a conditioned stimulus (CS) that was repeatedly presented without reinforcement prior to the CS-unconditioned stimulus (US) pairings. Using water-deprived rats as subjects, we observed that interpolating task-irrelevant stimulation between the preexposure and conditioning phases of a latent inhibition procedure attenuated latent inhibition (Experiments 1A, 1B, and 2). Apparently, interpolated stimulation segments the preexposure and conditioning treatments into two separate experiences, much in the same way that a change of context would. Consistent with this view, the interpolated stimulation did not disrupt latent inhibition if it was also presented during both preexposure and conditioning (Experiment 3). We view these results as analogous to those of Escobar, Arcediano, and Miller (2003), who suggested that the difficulty in observing latent inhibition in human adults is related to the segmentation between preexposure and conditioning caused by the usual interpolation of instructions in preparations with humans.

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