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Disability Ethos as Invention in the United States’ Twentieth and Early Twenty-First Centuries

Authors
  • stones, emily d.
  • meyer, craig a.
Publication Date
Jan 16, 2020
Identifiers
DOI: 10.3390/h9010011
OAI: oai:mdpi.com:/2076-0787/9/1/11/
Source
MDPI
Keywords
Language
English
License
Green
External links

Abstract

This article posits that disability activists routinely present a disability &ldquo / ethos of invention&rdquo / as central to the reformation of an ableist society. Dominant societal approaches to disability injustice, such as rehabilitation, accessibility, and inclusion, may touch upon the concept of invention / but, with ethotic discourse, we emphasize disability as generative and adept at producing new ways of knowing and being in the world. We identify an &ldquo / ethos of invention&rdquo / as driving early resistance to socially constructed &ldquo / normalcy&rdquo / , leading the push for cross-disability alliances to incorporate intersectional experiences and propelling the discursive move from inclusion to social justice. Through our partial re-telling of disability rights history, we articulate invention as central to it and supporting its aims to affirm disability culture, reform society through disabled perspectives and values, and promote people with disabilities&rsquo / full participation in society.

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