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Direct recognition of superparamagnetic nanocrystals by macrophage scavenger receptor SR-AI.

Authors
Type
Published Article
Journal
ACS Nano
Publisher
American Chemical Society
Volume
7
Issue
5
Pages
4289–4298
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1021/nn400769e
Source
Kesari Lab
License
Unknown

Abstract

Scavenger receptors (SRs) are molecular pattern recognition receptors that have been shown to mediate opsonin-independent uptake of therapeutic and imaging nanoparticles, underlying the importance of SRs in nanomedicine. Unlike pathogens, engineered nanomaterials offer great flexibility in control of surface properties, allowing addressing specific questions regarding the molecular mechanisms of nanoparticle recognition. Recently, we showed that SR-type AI/II mediates opsonin-independent internalization of dextran superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticles via positively charged extracellular collagen-like domain. To understand the mechanism of opsonin-independent SPIO recognition, we tested the binding and uptake of nanoparticles with different surface coatings by SR-AI. SPIO coated with 10 kDa dextran was efficiently recognized and taken up by SR-AI transfected cells and J774 macrophages, while SPIO with 20 kDa dextran coating or cross-linked dextran hydrogel avoided the binding and uptake. Nanoparticle negative charge density and zeta-potential did not correlate with SR-AI binding/uptake efficiency. Additional experiments and computer modeling revealed that recognition of the iron oxide crystalline core by the positively charged collagen-like domain of SR-AI is sterically hindered by surface polymer coating. Importantly, the modeling revealed a strong complementarity between the surface Fe-OH groups of the magnetite crystal and the charged lysines of the collagen-like domain of SR-AI, suggesting a specific recognition of SPIO crystalline surface. These data provide an insight into the molecular recognition of nanocrystals by innate immunity receptors and the mechanisms whereby polymer coatings promote immune evasion.

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