Affordable Access

The difficulty of producing sterility by operations on the fallopian tubes.

Authors
  • Leonard, V N
Type
Published Article
Journal
The American journal of obstetrics and diseases of women and children
Publication Date
Mar 01, 1913
Volume
67
Issue
3
Pages
443–450
Identifiers
PMID: 12309849
Source
Medline
Keywords
License
Unknown

Abstract

The ineffectiveness of tubal surgery in rendering a woman sterile is discussed in this review of surgical procedures used for tubal ligation and/or excision. The following methods have been used: tubal ligation, section and resection of tubes between 2 ligatures, resection of tubes between 2 ligatures with burial of the uterine end, cauterization of sectioned tubes, bilateral salpingectomy, and resection of interstitial canal by removal of a wedge-shaped piece of uterine cornu. In a retrospective look at tubal ligation procedures performed at Johns Hopkins, it was noted that 14 of 23 tubal ligations could be traced for follow-up, and of these 5 were over 40 years old at time of operation, but 2 of the remaining 9 cases had become pregnant after surgery. A case history of a patient whose tubes were sectioned and resectioned showed that she too became pregnant after surgery. Hence, until more satisfactory methods are devised, extirpation of the tubes together with excision of a wedge of uterine cornu is the simplest and most effective tubal sterilization procedure.

Report this publication

Statistics

Seen <100 times