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Different mechanisms of free fatty acid flip-flop and dissociation revealed by temperature and molecular species dependence of transport across lipid vesicles.

Authors
  • Kampf, J Patrick
  • Cupp, David
  • Kleinfeld, Alan M
Type
Published Article
Journal
The Journal of biological chemistry
Publication Date
Jul 28, 2006
Volume
281
Issue
30
Pages
21566–21574
Identifiers
PMID: 16737957
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

The mechanism of free fatty acid (FFA) transport across membranes is a subject of intense investigation. We have demonstrated recently that flip-flop is the rate-limiting step for transport of oleic acid across phospholipid vesicles (Cupp, D., Kampf, J. P., and Kleinfeld, A. M. (2004) Biochemistry 43, 4473-4481). To better understand the nature of the flip-flop barrier, we measured the temperature dependence of a series of saturated and monounsaturated FFA. We determined the rate constants for flip-flop and dissociation for small (SUV), large (LUV), and giant (GUV) unilamellar vesicles composed of egg phosphatidylcholine. For all FFA and vesicle types, dissociation was faster than flip-flop, and for all FFA, flip-flop and dissociation were faster in SUV than in LUV or GUV. Rate constants for both flip-flop and dissociation decreased exponentially with increasing FFA size. However, only the flip-flop rate constants increased significantly with temperature; the barrier to flip-flop was virtually entirely due to an enthalpic activation free energy. The barrier to dissociation was primarily entropic. Analysis in terms of a simple free volume (V(f)) model revealed V(f) values for flip-flop that ranged between approximately 12 and 15 Angstroms(3), with larger values for SUV than for LUV or GUV. V(f) values increased with temperature, and this temperature dependence generated the enthalpic barrier to flip-flop. The barrier for dissociation and its size dependence primarily reflect the aqueous solubility of FFA. These are the first results to distinguish the energetics of flipflop and dissociation. This should lead to a better understanding of the mechanisms governing FFA transport across biological membranes.

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