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Different intestinal permeability patterns in relatives and spouses of patients with Crohn's disease: an inherited defect in mucosal defence?

Authors
  • Söderholm, J D
  • Olaison, G
  • Lindberg, E
  • Hannestad, U
  • Vindels, A
  • Tysk, C
  • Järnerot, G
  • Sjödahl, R
Type
Published Article
Journal
Gut
Publication Date
Jan 01, 1999
Volume
44
Issue
1
Pages
96–100
Identifiers
PMID: 9862833
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

Baseline permeability was higher in patients and spouses than in controls. An abnormal baseline permeability was seen in 36% of the patients, 23% of the spouses, 18% of the relatives, and 3% of the controls. After ingestion of acetylsalicylic acid, permeability increased significantly in all groups. Relatives were similar to patients with regard to permeability after exposure to acetylsalicylic acid, whereas spouses were similar to controls. The proportions with an abnormal permeability response to acetylsalicylic acid were 32% in patients, 14% in spouses, 41% in relatives, and 3% in controls. CONCLUSION The findings suggest that baseline permeability is determined by environmental factors, whereas permeability provoked by acetylsalicylic acid is a function of the genetically determined state of the mucosal barrier, and support the notion that environmental and hereditary factors interact in the pathogenesis of Crohn's disease.

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