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Differences in fatty acid composition between cerebral brain lobes in juvenile pigs after fish oil feeding

Authors
  • Dullemeijer, C.
  • Zock, P.L.
  • Coronel, R.
  • Katan, M.B.
  • Brummer, R.J.
  • Kok, F.J.
  • Beekman, J.
  • Brouwer, I.A.
Publication Date
Jan 01, 2008
Source
Wageningen University and Researchcenter Publications
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown
External links

Abstract

Very long-chain n-3 PUFA from fish are suggested to play a role in the development of the brain. Fish oil feeding results in higher proportions of n-3 PUFA in the brains of newborn piglets. However, the effect of fish oil on the fatty acid composition of specific cerebral brain lobes in juvenile pigs is largely uninvestigated. This study examined the effect of a fish oil diet on the fatty acid composition of the frontal, parietal, temporal and occipital brain lobes in juvenile pigs (7 weeks old). Pigs were randomly allocated to a semipurified pig diet containing either 4 % (w/w) fish oil (n 19) or 4 % (w/w) high-oleic acid sunflower oil (HOSF diet, n 18) for a period of 8 weeks. The fish oil diet resulted in significantly higher proportions (%) of DHA in the frontal (10·6 (sd1·2)), parietal (10·2 (sd1·5)) and occipital brain lobes (9·9 (sd 1·3)), but not in the temporal lobe (7·7 (sd1·6)), compared with pigs fed the HOSF diet (frontal lobe, 7·5 (sd1·0); parietal lobe, 8·1 (sd 1·3); occipital lobe, 7·3 (sd1·2), temporal lobe, 6·6 (sd1·2). Moreover, the proportion of DHA was significantly lower in the temporal lobe compared with the frontal, parietal and occipital brain lobes in pigs fed a fish oil diet. In conclusion, the brains of juvenile pigs appear to be responsive to dietary fish oil, although the temporal brain lobe is less responsive compared with the other three brain lobes. The functional consequences of these differences are a challenging focus for future investigation.

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