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Dietary sources of energy and nutrient intake among children and adolescents with chronic kidney disease.

Authors
  • Chen, Wen1, 2
  • Ducharme-Smith, Kirstie3
  • Davis, Laura3
  • Hui, Wun Fung4
  • Warady, Bradley A2
  • Furth, Susan L4, 5
  • Abraham, Alison G6, 7
  • Betoko, Aisha8
  • 1 Department of Nutrition and Food Hygiene, School of Public Health, Tianjin Medical University, Tianjin, China. , (China)
  • 2 Division of Pediatric Nephrology, Children's Mercy Hospital, Kansas City, MO, USA.
  • 3 Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, MD, USA.
  • 4 Department of Pediatrics, The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA, USA.
  • 5 Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USA.
  • 6 Department of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, 615 N. Wolfe Street, Baltimore, MD, 21205, USA.
  • 7 Department of Ophthalmology, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA.
  • 8 Department of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, 615 N. Wolfe Street, Baltimore, MD, 21205, USA. [email protected]
Type
Published Article
Journal
Pediatric Nephrology
Publisher
Springer-Verlag
Publication Date
Jul 01, 2017
Volume
32
Issue
7
Pages
1233–1241
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1007/s00467-017-3580-0
PMID: 28210840
Source
Medline
Keywords
License
Unknown

Abstract

Children with CKD consumed more sodium, protein, and calories but less potassium than recommended by the National Kidney Foundation (NKF) guidelines for pediatric CKD. Energy, protein, and sodium intake is heavily driven by consumption of milk and fast foods. Limiting contribution of fast foods in patients with good appetite may be particularly important for maintaining recommended energy and sodium intake, as overconsumption can increase the risk of obesity and cardiovascular complications in that population.

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