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Dietary management and physical exercise can improve climbing defects and mitochondrial activity in Drosophila melanogaster parkin null mutants.

Authors
  • Bajracharya, Rijan1
  • Ballard, J William O1
  • 1 a School of Biotechnology and Biomolecular Sciences , University of New South Wales , Sydney , Australia. , (Australia)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Fly
Publisher
Landes Bioscience
Publication Date
Jan 01, 2018
Volume
12
Issue
2
Pages
95–104
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1080/19336934.2018.1482139
PMID: 30068249
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Physical exercise can improve gait, balance, tremor, flexibility, grip strength and motor coordination in Parkinson's disease (PD) patients. Several lines of evidence have also shown the therapeutic potential of dietary management and supplementation in halting the progression of PD. However, there is a lack of research on the combined effects of physical activity and nutrition in the progression of PD. We test the effects exercise and dietary modification in a Drosophila model of PD. In this study, we fed Drosophila parkin mutants high protein and high carbohydrate diets without and with stearic acid (4 treatments in total). In parallel, we subjected mutants to a regimen of exercise using a purpose-built 'Power tower' exercise machine. We then measured climbing ability, aconitase activity, and basal mitochondrial ROS levels. We observed that exercising parkin mutants fed the high protein diet improved their climbing ability and increased aconitase activity. There was an additional improvement in climbing and aconitase activity in exercised parkin mutants fed the high protein diet supplemented with stearic acid. No benefits of exercise were seen in parkin mutants fed the high carbohydrate diet. Combined, these results suggest that dietary management along with physical activty has potential to improve mitochondrial biogenesis and delay the progression of PD in Drosophila parkin mutants.

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