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A dietary carotenoid reduces immunopathology and enhances longevity through an immune depressive effect in an insect model

Authors
  • Dhinaut, Julien
  • Balourdet, Aude
  • Teixeira, Maria
  • Chogne, Manon
  • Moret, Yannick
Type
Published Article
Journal
Scientific Reports
Publisher
Springer Nature
Publication Date
Sep 29, 2017
Volume
7
Issue
1
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1038/s41598-017-12769-7
Source
Springer Nature
License
Green

Abstract

Immunopathology corresponds to self-damage of the inflammatory response, resulting from oxidizing molecules produced when the immune system is activated. Immunopathology often contributes to age-related diseases and is believed to accelerate ageing. Prevention of immunopathology relies on endogenous antioxidant enzymes and the consumption of dietary antioxidants, including carotenoids such as astaxanthin. Astaxanthin currently raises considerable interest as a powerful antioxidant and for its potential in alleviating age-related diseases. Current in vitro and short-term in vivo studies provide promising results about immune-stimulating and antioxidant properties of astaxanthin. However, to what extent dietary supplementation with astaxanthin can prevent long-term adverse effects of immunopathology on longevity is unknown so far. Here, using the mealworm beetle, Tenebrio molitor, as biological model we tested the effect of lifetime dietary supplementation with astaxanthin on longevity when exposed to early life inflammation. While supplementation with astaxanthin was found to lessen immunopathology cost on larval survival and insect longevity, it was also found to reduce immunity, growth rate and the survival of non immune-challenged larvae. This study therefore reveals that astaxanthin prevents immunopathology through an immune depressive effect and can have adverse consequences on growth.

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