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Did "Conduce Sin Alcohol" a Program that Monitors Breath Alcohol Concentration Limits for Driving in Mexico City Have an Effect on Traffic-Related Deaths?

Authors
  • Colchero, M A1
  • Guerrero-López, C M2
  • Quiroz-Reyes, J A2
  • Bautista-Arredondo, S2
  • 1 Center for Health Systems Research, Instituto Nacional de Salud Pública, Cuernavaca, Morelos, Mexico. [email protected] , (Mexico)
  • 2 Center for Health Systems Research, Instituto Nacional de Salud Pública, Cuernavaca, Morelos, Mexico. , (Mexico)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Prevention science : the official journal of the Society for Prevention Research
Publication Date
Oct 01, 2020
Volume
21
Issue
7
Pages
979–984
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1007/s11121-020-01133-3
PMID: 32671671
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

In September 2003, Mexico City introduced "Conduce sin Alcohol" (CSA)-drive without alcohol-a program that monitors breath alcohol concentration limits among drivers to reduce road traffic crashes. To our knowledge, no study has evaluated the impact of this program on mortality. We estimated the effect of CSA on the monthly rate of traffic-related deaths (deaths per one million people) in Mexico City. We applied interrupted time series analyses (ITSA) using monthly data from 1998 to 2016, adjusting for number of people covered by a public health insurance, monthly number of public health care facilities in the city, monthly average rain precipitation in milliliters, and number of vehicles registered. Our results show a statistically significant average reduction in the monthly trend of traffic-related deaths of 0.08 per 1 million people/per month after the program was implemented relative to the pre-intervention trend. The relative difference comparing pre- and post-intervention predicted values from the ITSA model shows that there was a 23.2% reduction in the fatality rate. Findings from this study can be used to scale up programs to monitor alcohol concentration limits among drivers in cities with high alcohol-related crashes and deaths where the program has not been implemented.

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