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Diagnostic urinary cfDNA detected in human cystic echinococcosis.

Authors
  • Toribio, Luz1
  • Santivanez, Saul2
  • Scott, Alan L3
  • Enriquez, Raul1
  • Sedano, Cesar1
  • Soto-Becerra, Percy1
  • Garcia, Hector H4
  • Shiff, Clive J5
  • 1 Center for Global Health, Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia, Lima, Peru. , (Peru)
  • 2 Center for Global Health, Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia, Lima, Peru; Cysticercosis Unit, Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Neurologicas, Lima, Peru. , (Peru)
  • 3 W. Harry Feinstone Department of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology, Bloomberg School of Public Health, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, United States. , (United States)
  • 4 Center for Global Health, Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia, Lima, Peru; W. Harry Feinstone Department of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology, Bloomberg School of Public Health, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, United States. , (Peru)
  • 5 W. Harry Feinstone Department of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology, Bloomberg School of Public Health, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, United States. Electronic address: [email protected] , (United States)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Molecular and biochemical parasitology
Publication Date
Sep 01, 2020
Volume
239
Pages
111314–111314
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/j.molbiopara.2020.111314
PMID: 32866606
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Cystic echinococcosis (CE) is a major neglected tropical zoonotic disease caused by the tissue-dwelling larval stage of the cestode parasite Echinococcus granulosus. For individuals suspected of CE, the diagnostic standard is imaging using ultrasonography, X rays, or computed tomography. These resource-demanding and expensive procedures are rarely available in endemic rural areas where CE is most prevalent. There is a critical need for a new approach to identify CE patients so that they can be managed early in the course of their infection. This study reports on the results of a diagnostic approach that identifies E. granulosus-derived cell-free DNA (cfDNA) in the urine of CE patients. Utilizing PCR to amplify a fragment of a major tandem repeat element found in E. granulosus nuclear DNA, urine samples from all seven imaging-confirmed CE patients who harbored active liver cysts were positive. In addition, the urine samples from 2/4 patients who presented with non-viable/calcified liver cysts were also PCR positive for the repeat fragment. To our knowledge, this is the first report of using parasite cfDNA from urine to diagnose CE. This approach provides an easy to implement and cost-effective method to survey for the prevalence of E. granulosus in humans populations. Copyright © 2020 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

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