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Diagnostic Imaging of Discospondylitis.

Authors
  • Ruoff, Catherine M1
  • Kerwin, Sharon C2
  • Taylor, Amanda R3
  • 1 Department of Large Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 77843-4475, USA.
  • 2 Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 77843-4474, USA. Electronic address: [email protected]
  • 3 Department of Clinical Sciences, Auburn University College of Veterinary Medicine, Greene Hall, 1130 Wire Road, Auburn, AL 36849, USA.
Type
Published Article
Journal
The Veterinary clinics of North America. Small animal practice
Publication Date
Jan 01, 2018
Volume
48
Issue
1
Pages
85–94
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/j.cvsm.2017.08.007
PMID: 28964545
Source
Medline
Keywords
License
Unknown

Abstract

Discospondylitis can affect dogs of any age and breed and may be seen in cats. Although radiography remains the gold standard, advanced imaging, such as CT and MRI, has benefits and likely allows earlier diagnosis and identification of concurrent disease. Because discospondylitis may affect multiple disk spaces, imaging of the entire spine should be considered. There is a lengthening list of causative etiologic agents, and successful treatment hinges on correct identification. Image-guided biopsy should be considered in addition to blood and urine cultures and Brucella canis screening and as an alternative to surgical biopsy in some cases.

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