Affordable Access

Access to the full text

Diagnostic Ability of Magnifying Blue Light Imaging with a Light Emitting Diode Light Source for Early Gastric Cancer: A Prospective Comparative Study

Authors
  • Takayama, Shun
  • Dohi, Osamu
  • Naito, Yuji
  • Azuma, Yuka
  • Ishida, Tsugitaka
  • Kitae, Hiroaki
  • Matsumura, Shinya
  • Ogita, Kazuyuki
  • Mizuno, Naoki
  • Terasaki, Kei
  • Nakano, Takahiro
  • Ueda, Tomohiro
  • Morinaga, Yukiko
  • Hirose, Ryohei
  • Inoue, Ken
  • Yoshida, Naohisa
  • Kamada, Kazuhiro
  • Uchiyama, Kazuhiko
  • Ishikawa, Takeshi
  • Takagi, Tomohisa
  • And 4 more
Type
Published Article
Journal
Digestion
Publisher
S. Karger AG
Publication Date
Dec 12, 2019
Volume
102
Issue
4
Pages
580–589
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1159/000505018
PMID: 31830748
Source
Karger
Keywords
Disciplines
  • Research Article
License
Green
External links

Abstract

Introduction: An innovative endoscopic system using 4-color light-emitting diodes (LED) was released between 2016 and 2017 in locations that had not approved laser endoscopes for use, including the United States and Europe. Objective: This study compared the diagnostic efficacy between magnifying blue light imaging with an LED light source (LED-BLI) and magnifying blue laser imaging with a laser light source (Laser-BLI) for early gastric cancer (EGC). Methods: In this prospective, single-center, noninferiority study, 80 gastric lesions were evaluated between January 2017 and July 2017. The magnifying findings of gastric lesions – including the demarcation line (DL), microvascular pattern (MVP), and microsurface pattern (MSP) – were evaluated using Laser-BLI and LED-BLI according to the vessel plus surface classification system (VSCS). The primary end point was to determine whether the diagnostic accuracy of LED-BLI for EGC was noninferior to that of conventional Laser-BLI. Results: Overall, we evaluated 79 gastric lesions histopathologically diagnosed as adenocarcinomas from the specimens obtained via endoscopic submucosal dissection. A DL was observed by Laser-BLI and LED-BLI in 98.7% (78/79) and 96.2% (76/79) of EGCs, respectively. The MVP observed using Laser-BLI and LED-BLI was irregular in 92.4% (73/79) and 89.9% (71/79), respectively. The MSP observed using Laser-BLI and LED-BLI was irregular in 83.5% (66/79) and 82.2% (65/79), respectively. According to the VSCS, diagnosable cancers were found in 94.9% (75/79) and 93.7% (74/79) of cases when using Laser-BLI and LED-BLI, respectively (p = 0.73; difference ratio, 1.2%; 95% CI –8.5 to 6.0%). Conclusions: LED-BLI could accurately visualize the DL, MVP, and MSP of EGCs and was not inferior to Laser-BLI. Therefore, LED-BLI can be used to diagnose EGC accurately according to the VSCS-based diagnosis criteria.

Report this publication

Statistics

Seen <100 times