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Diagnosis of parainfluenza virus infection in children and older patients by detection of specific IgM antibody.

Authors
  • van der Logt, J T
  • van Loon, A M
  • Heessen, F W
  • van der Veen, J
Type
Published Article
Journal
Journal of medical virology
Publication Date
Jun 01, 1985
Volume
16
Issue
2
Pages
191–199
Identifiers
PMID: 2989421
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

The significance of detecting specific antibody of the IgM class for the diagnosis of parainfluenza infections was examined. Paired sera from 763 children and adults admitted to the hospital for acute respiratory disease were tested for significant antibody titer rises in the hemagglutination inhibition (HI) test and for specific IgM antibody with the hemadsorption immunosorbent techniques (HIT). Sera were collected during two 6-month periods, January through June, 1982 and 1983. Evidence of parainfluenza infections was found in 122 patients (16%): 83 (25%) in 1982 and 39 (9.1%) in 1983. The HIT was superior to the HI test for detection of parainfluenza infection, in particular in infants and aged patients, 94 patients were positive only in the HIT test, 12 in the HI test, and 16 in both tests. In a control group of 120 persons (time- and age-matched to the patients of 1982) admitted for nonrespiratory illness, six (5%) showed parainfluenza IgM in their serum. Blocking experiments and retrospective clinical information indicated that the IgM antibody detected in these individuals is specific IgM acquired after a mild parainfluenza infection. Most (66%) patients showed IgM antibody titer rises or high titers (greater than 1,280) in both sera, and in 23%, a fall in IgM antibody titer was found. Detection of specific IgM antibody by HIT permitted early presumptive diagnosis in 71% of the patients with parainfluenza infection. IgM antibody persisted for 2-11 weeks. The HIT appears to be an important supplement for the diagnosis of parainfluenza infections.

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