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Diagnosis and management of gout by clinicians in Nepal: a web-based survey.

Authors
  • Vaidya, Binit1
  • Pudasaini, Kalpana2
  • Baral, Rikesh2
  • Nakarmi, Shweta2
  • 1 National Center for Rheumatic Diseases (NCRD), Ratopul, Kathmandu, Nepal. [email protected] , (Nepal)
  • 2 National Center for Rheumatic Diseases (NCRD), Ratopul, Kathmandu, Nepal. , (Nepal)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Rheumatology International
Publisher
Springer-Verlag
Publication Date
Jul 01, 2021
Volume
41
Issue
7
Pages
1311–1319
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1007/s00296-020-04712-3
PMID: 33025111
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Patients with gout in Nepal are usually attended by medical graduates, family medicine, internists, and orthopedic surgeons. The study aimed to evaluate knowledge, attitude, and practice (KAP) of point-of-care clinicians of Nepal regarding diagnosis and management of gout and assess the quality of treatment provided to the patients. A web-based descriptive, cross-sectional study was conducted among doctors managing gout patients. The questionnaire comprises 38 multiple choice questions; 9 questions for demographic data, 8, 11, and 10 questions each for knowledge, attitude, and practice, respectively. A pilot study was conducted to observe comprehensibility of the questionnaire before subjecting it to the participants. Ethical approval was obtained from review committee of National Center for Rheumatic diseases, Nepal. Simple descriptive statistics was used to describe the correct responses. Among 1200 clinicians invited, 32% (380) participated in the survey. Maximum respondents were of age group 25-45 years (82%) with majority being internists (43%). Although only 32% understood that the disease is not curable, knowledge regarding disease was acceptable in majority (60-90%). Around 83% denied attending any gout-related seminars and 34% denied being updated with the recent guidelines. The majority of postgraduates (72%) managed the cases themselves. Although there was acceptable practice accuracy on use of therapy for acute attacks (75%), target urate levels (57%), and use of urate-lowering agents (92%), they lacked in adequate screening of co-morbidities and initiation of long-term treatment. The point-of-care clinicians have adequate knowledge to diagnose and treat acute events. However, there is poor reflection in practice and frequent update of treatment guidelines is warranted.

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