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Developmental Trajectories of Religious Service Attendance: Predictors of Nicotine Dependence and Alcohol Dependence/Abuse in Early Midlife.

Authors
  • Zhang, Chenshu1
  • Brook, Judith S2
  • Leukefeld, Carl G3
  • Brook, David W4
  • 1 Department of Medicine, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY, USA. [email protected]
  • 2 Department of Psychiatry, New York University School of Medicine, 215 Lexington Avenue, 15th Floor, New York, NY, 10016, USA. [email protected]
  • 3 Department of Behavioral Sciences, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY, USA.
  • 4 Department of Psychiatry, New York University School of Medicine, 215 Lexington Avenue, 15th Floor, New York, NY, 10016, USA.
Type
Published Article
Journal
Journal of Religion and Health
Publisher
Springer-Verlag
Publication Date
Jun 01, 2021
Volume
60
Issue
3
Pages
1766–1779
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1007/s10943-019-00787-w
PMID: 30879207
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

This longitudinal study assesses the associations between developmental trajectories of religious service attendance from mean age 14 to mean age 43 and nicotine dependence and alcohol dependence/abuse at mean age 43 (N = 548). Six trajectories of religious service attendance were identified. As compared with belonging to weekly stable trajectory group, a higher probability of belonging to the weekly/none decreasing, occasional stable, and non-attendance trajectory group was significantly associated with a higher likelihood of nicotine dependence. In addition, as compared with belonging to weekly stable trajectory group, a higher probability of belonging to the weekly/none decreasing, weekly/occasional decreasing, occasional stable, and non-attendance trajectory group was significantly associated with a higher likelihood of alcohol dependence/abuse. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that religious service attendance protects against nicotine dependence and alcohol dependence/abuse in early midlife.

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