Affordable Access

deepdyve-link
Publisher Website

Development of Peritoneal Carcinomatosis in Epithelial Ovarian Cancer: A Review.

Authors
  • van Baal, Juliette O A M1
  • van Noorden, Cornelis J F2
  • Nieuwland, Rienk3
  • Van de Vijver, Koen K4
  • Sturk, Auguste5
  • van Driel, Willemien J1
  • Kenter, Gemma G1
  • Lok, Christianne A R1
  • 1 Department of Gynecologic Oncology, Center for Gynecologic Oncology, Netherlands Cancer Institute/Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. , (Netherlands)
  • 2 Cancer Center Amsterdam, Department of Medical Biology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. , (Netherlands)
  • 3 Laboratory of Experimental Clinical Chemistry, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. , (Netherlands)
  • 4 Division of Diagnostic Oncology & Molecular Pathology, Netherlands Cancer Institute/Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. , (Netherlands)
  • 5 Department of Clinical Chemistry, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. , (Netherlands)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Journal of Histochemistry & Cytochemistry
Publisher
SAGE Publications
Publication Date
Feb 01, 2018
Volume
66
Issue
2
Pages
67–83
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1369/0022155417742897
PMID: 29164988
Source
Medline
Keywords
License
Unknown

Abstract

Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) metastasizes intra-abdominally with often numerous, superficial, small-sized lesions. This so-called peritoneal carcinomatosis is difficult to treat, and peritoneal recurrences are frequently observed, leading to a poor prognosis. Underlying mechanisms of interactions between EOC and peritoneal cells are incompletely understood. This review summarizes and discusses the development of peritoneal carcinomatosis from a cell-biological perspective, focusing on characteristics of EOC and peritoneal cells. We aim to provide insight into how peritoneum facilitates tumor adhesion but limits size of lesions and depth of invasion. The development of peritoneal carcinomatosis is a multistep process that requires adaptations of EOC and peritoneal cells. Mechanisms that enable tumor adhesion and growth involve cadherin restructuring on EOC cells, integrin-mediated adhesion, and mesothelial evasion by mechanical forces driven by integrin-ligand interactions. Clinical trials targeting these mechanisms, however, showed only limited effects. Other factors that inhibit tumor growth and deep invasion are virtually unknown. Future studies are needed to elucidate the exact mechanisms that underlie the development and limited growth of peritoneal carcinomatosis. This review on development of peritoneal carcinomatosis of EOC summarizes the current knowledge and its limitations. Clarification of the stepwise process may inspire future research to investigate new treatment approaches of peritoneal carcinomatosis.

Report this publication

Statistics

Seen <100 times