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The Development of Ethnic-Racial Identity Process and Its Relation to Civic Beliefs among Latinx and Black American Adolescents.

Authors
  • Bañales, Josefina1
  • Hoffman, Adam J2
  • Rivas-Drake, Deborah3
  • Jagers, Robert J4
  • 1 Department of Psychology, University of Pittsburgh, 210 South Bouquet Street, Pittsburgh, PA, 15260, USA. [email protected]
  • 2 Department of Psychology, North Carolina State University, 751 Poe Hall, Raleigh, NC, 27607, USA.
  • 3 Department of Psychology, University of Michigan, 530 Church Street, Ann Arbor, MI, 48103, USA.
  • 4 Collaborative for Academic, Social, and Emotional Learning, Chicago, IL, 60607, USA.
Type
Published Article
Journal
Journal of Youth and Adolescence
Publisher
Springer-Verlag
Publication Date
Dec 01, 2020
Volume
49
Issue
12
Pages
2495–2508
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1007/s10964-020-01254-6
PMID: 32468392
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Despite associations between ethnic-racial identity processes (i.e., exploration and resolution) and positive psychosocial outcomes among adolescents, limited empirical research investigates longitudinal associations between these processes and civic beliefs. To address this gap in the literature, this research explored whether changes in ethnic-racial identity exploration and resolution predicted civic beliefs among adolescents. Participants included 400 Latinx (n = 121; 47.1% girls) and Black American (n = 279; 52.0% girls) adolescents in the 6th (n = 210), 7th (n = 113) and 8th Grades (n = 74). Neither initial levels nor changes in ethnic-racial identity exploration predicted civic beliefs across four time-points of the study, or across two years of middle school. Adolescents who demonstrated greater increases in ethnic-racial identity resolution across two years of middle school were likely to have greater civic beliefs by the end of the two years, as compared to adolescents who had smaller increases in resolution. These results suggest that adolescents who have an increasingly clear sense of their ethnic-racial selves may have greater access to cognitive and socioemotional resources that promote their development of beliefs on the need to advance the well-being of their communities.

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