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Determining priorities in functional rehabilitation related to quality of life one-year following a traumatic spinal cord injury.

Authors
  • Richard-Denis, Andréane1, 2
  • Benazet, Delphine2
  • Thompson, Cynthia1
  • Mac-Thiong, Jean-Marc1, 2, 3
  • 1 Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Research Center, Hôpital du Sacré-Cœur de Montréal, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. , (Canada)
  • 2 Faculty of Medicine, University of Montreal, Pavillon Roger-Gaudry, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. , (Canada)
  • 3 Sainte-Justine University Hospital Research Center, Montréal, Quebec, Canada. , (Canada)
Type
Published Article
Journal
The journal of spinal cord medicine
Publication Date
Mar 01, 2020
Volume
43
Issue
2
Pages
241–246
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1080/10790268.2018.1517138
PMID: 30188803
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Context/Objective: To determine the relationship between the different functional aspects (as determined by the Spinal Cord Independence Measure) and quality of life (QOL) following a traumatic spinal cord injury (TSCI), considering clinical confounding factors.Design: Retrospective review of a prospective cohortSetting: A single Level-1 trauma center specialized in SCI careParticipants: One hundred and forty-two individuals sustaining an acute traumatic SCIInterventions: Not applicableOutcome measures: The four QOL domains as assessed by the WHOQoL-bref questionnaire 6-12 months following a TSCI.Results: Mobility subscore was the only functional aspect significantly associated with all QOL domains (physical, psychological, social and environmental). Females present better chronic social and environmental QOL when compared to males. The level of injury may also influence environmental QOL.Conclusion: Mobility training (mobility in bed, mobility with or without technical aids, transfers and stair management) should be an important part of the rehabilitation process in order to optimize chronic QOL following a TSCI.

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