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Determinants of healthcare worker turnover in intensive care units: A micro-macro multilevel analysis.

Authors
  • Daouda, Oumou Salama1
  • Hocine, Mounia N1
  • Temime, Laura1
  • 1 Modélisation Epidémiologie et Surveillance des Risques Sanitaires (MESuRS) Laboratory, Conservatoire National des Arts et Métiers (Cnam), Paris, France. , (France)
Type
Published Article
Journal
PLoS ONE
Publisher
Public Library of Science
Publication Date
Jan 01, 2021
Volume
16
Issue
5
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0251779
PMID: 33989358
Source
Medline
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

High turnover among healthcare workers is an increasingly common phenomenon in hospitals worldwide, especially in intensive care units (ICUs). In addition to the serious financial consequences, this is a major concern for patient care (disrupted continuity of care, decreased quality and safety of care, increased rates of medication errors, …). The goal of this article was to understand how the ICU-level nurse turnover rate may be explained from multiple covariates at individual and ICU-level, using data from 526 French registered and auxiliary nurses (RANs). A cross-sectional study was conducted in ICUs of Paris-area hospitals in 2013. First, we developed a small extension of a multi-level modeling method proposed in 2007 by Croon and van Veldhoven and validated its properties using a comprehensive simulation study. Second, we applied this approach to explain RAN turnover in French ICUs. Based on the simulation study, the approach we proposed allows to estimate the regression coefficients with a relative bias below 7% for group-level factors and below 12% for individual-level factors. In our data, the mean observed RAN turnover rate was 0.19 per year (SD = 0.09). Based on our results, social support from colleagues and supervisors as well as long durations of experience in the profession were negatively associated with turnover. Conversely, number of children and impossibility to skip a break due to workload were significantly associated with higher rates of turnover. At ICU-level, number of beds, presence of intermediate care beds (continuous care unit) in the ICU and staff-to-patient ratio emerged as significant predictors. The findings of this research may help decision makers within hospitals by highlighting major determinants of turnover among RANs. In addition, the new approach proposed here could prove useful to researchers faced with similar micro-macro data.

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