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Detection of hepatitis C virus antibodies and specific hepatitis C virus ribonucleic acid sequences in cord bloods from a heterogeneous prenatal population

Authors
  • Silverman, Neil S.
  • Snyder, Michael
  • Hodinka, Richard L.
  • McGillen, Patricia
  • Knee, Gerald
Type
Published Article
Journal
American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology
Publisher
Elsevier
Publication Date
Jan 01, 1995
Accepted Date
Mar 14, 1995
Volume
173
Issue
5
Pages
1396–1400
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/0002-9378(95)90623-1
Source
Elsevier
Keywords
License
Unknown

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: Our aim was to quantify the prevalence of at-risk pregnancies for maternal-fetal hepatitis C virus transmission in a heterogeneous prenatal population by detection of both hepatitis C virus-specific antibody and hepatitis C virus ribonucleic acid sequencesin cord bloods from their deliveries. STUDY DESIGN: An anonymous serosurvey of 1432 consecutive umbilical cord blood samples were analyzed for hepatitis C virus antibodies with a second-generation enzyme immunoassay with all hepatitis C virus antibody-positive samples batched and analyzed for both human immunodeficiency virus antibodies and hepatitis C virus ribonucleic acid sequences by polymerase chain reaction. RESULTS: Forty-seven of the samples (3.2%) were positive for hepatitis C virus antibodies; seropositivity rates differed significantly by socioeconomic status but not by race. Significantly more of the antibody-positive women underwent cesarean section for delivery (31.9% vs 21.9%, p = 0.03). Three (6.4%) hepatitis C virus antibody-positive samples were also human immunodeficiency virus-antibody positive, hepatitis C virus antibody-positive samples were also human immunodeficiency virus-antibody positive, whereas nine (19.1%) were hepatitis C virus ribonucleic acid positive. CONCLUSION: As many as 19% of hepatitis C virus antibody-positive women in this study also had hepatitis C virus ribonucleic acid isolated from their delivery cord blood samples, which may indicate an increased risk of vertical hepatitis C virus transmission in those pregnancies. Hepatitis C virus-specific antibody and ribonucleic acid detection may also be markers for other pregnancy complications that results in higher rates of cesarean section for these women.

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