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Detection of de novo single nucleotide variants in offspring of atomic-bomb survivors close to the hypocenter by whole-genome sequencing

Authors
  • Horai, Makiko1
  • Mishima, Hiroyuki2
  • Hayashida, Chisa2
  • Kinoshita, Akira2
  • Nakane, Yoshibumi3
  • Matsuo, Tatsuki3
  • Tsuruda, Kazuto4
  • Yanagihara, Katsunori4
  • Sato, Shinya1
  • Imanishi, Daisuke1
  • Imaizumi, Yoshitaka1
  • Hata, Tomoko1
  • Miyazaki, Yasushi1
  • Yoshiura, Koh-ichiro2
  • 1 Atomic Bomb Disease Institute, Department of Hematology, Nagasaki University Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Nagasaki, Japan , Nagasaki (Japan)
  • 2 Atomic Bomb Disease Institute, Department of Human Genetics, Nagasaki University Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Nagasaki, Japan , Nagasaki (Japan)
  • 3 Nagasaki Atomic Bomb Casualty Council, Health Management Center, Nagasaki, Japan , Nagasaki (Japan)
  • 4 Nagasaki University Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Nagasaki, Japan , Nagasaki (Japan)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Journal of Human Genetics
Publisher
Springer Nature
Publication Date
Dec 26, 2017
Volume
63
Issue
3
Pages
357–363
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1038/s10038-017-0392-9
Source
Springer Nature
License
Yellow

Abstract

Ionizing radiation released by the atomic bombs at Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Japan, in 1945 caused many long-term illnesses, including increased risks of malignancies such as leukemia and solid tumours. Radiation has demonstrated genetic effects in animal models, leading to concerns over the potential hereditary effects of atomic bomb-related radiation. However, no direct analyses of whole DNA have yet been reported. We therefore investigated de novo variants in offspring of atomic-bomb survivors by whole-genome sequencing (WGS). We collected peripheral blood from three trios, each comprising a father (atomic-bomb survivor with acute radiation symptoms), a non-exposed mother, and their child, none of whom had any past history of haematological disorders. One trio of non-exposed individuals was included as a control. DNA was extracted and the numbers of de novo single nucleotide variants in the children were counted by WGS with sequencing confirmation. Gross structural variants were also analysed. Written informed consent was obtained from all participants prior to the study. There were 62, 81, and 42 de novo single nucleotide variants in the children of atomic-bomb survivors, compared with 48 in the control trio. There were no gross structural variants in any trio. These findings are in accord with previously published results that also showed no significant genetic effects of atomic-bomb radiation on second-generation survivors.

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