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Detecting an infiltrated intravenous catheter using indigo carmine: a novel method.

Authors
  • Chen, Mingda
  • Habib, Ashraf S
  • Panni, Moeen K
  • Schultz, John R
Type
Published Article
Journal
Anesthesia & Analgesia
Publisher
Ovid Technologies (Wolters Kluwer) - Anesthesia & Analgesia
Publication Date
Oct 01, 2007
Volume
105
Issue
4
Identifiers
PMID: 17898399
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

An extravasated IV catheter may have serious clinical consequences. These include the inability to circulate emergency medications, cause pain on injection, infection at the site, and tissue damage. Clinical signs such as swelling, redness, and pain with injection are valuable, but may not be helpful in the presence of obesity, edema, or in a tracheally intubated and sedated patient. Here we describe a case illustrating a novel approach in which we used an IV dye injection (indigo carmine) to detect a correctly placed and then an extravasated IV. The ability to see visible flow of IV dye intravascularly helped confirm the correct placement. The technique we describe is quick, safe, and inexpensive.

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