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Detecting hybridization using ancient DNA.

Authors
  • Nk, Schaefer
  • B, Shapiro
  • Re, Green
Type
Published Article
Journal
Molecular Ecology
Publisher
Wiley (Blackwell Publishing)
Volume
25
Issue
11
Pages
2398–2412
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1111/mec.13556
Source
UCSC Bioinformatics biomedical-ucsc
License
Unknown

Abstract

It is well established that related species hybridize and that this can have varied but significant effects on speciation and environmental adaptation. It should therefore come as no surprise that hybridization is not limited to species that are alive today. In the last several decades, advances in technologies for recovering and sequencing DNA from fossil remains have enabled the assembly of high-coverage genome sequences for a growing diversity of organisms, including many that are extinct. Thanks to the development of new statistical approaches for detecting and quantifying admixture from genomic data, genomes from extinct populations have proven useful both in revealing previously unknown hybridization events and informing the study of hybridization between living organisms. Here, we review some of the key recent statistical innovations for detecting ancient hybridization using genomewide sequence data and discuss how these innovations have revised our understanding of human evolutionary history.

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