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The derived-band envelope following response and its sensitivity to sensorineural hearing deficits.

Authors
  • Keshishzadeh, Sarineh1
  • Garrett, Markus2
  • Vasilkov, Viacheslav3
  • Verhulst, Sarah4
  • 1 Hearing Technology @ WAVES, Department of Information Technology, Ghent University, Technologiepark 126, Zwijnaarde, 9052, Belgium. Electronic address: [email protected] , (Belgium)
  • 2 Medizinische Physik and Cluster of Excellence Hearing4all, Department of Medical Physics and Acoustics, University of Oldenburg, Carl-von-Ossietzky Strasse 9-11, 26120, Oldenburg, Germany. Electronic address: [email protected] , (Germany)
  • 3 Hearing Technology @ WAVES, Department of Information Technology, Ghent University, Technologiepark 126, Zwijnaarde, 9052, Belgium. Electronic address: [email protected] , (Belgium)
  • 4 Hearing Technology @ WAVES, Department of Information Technology, Ghent University, Technologiepark 126, Zwijnaarde, 9052, Belgium. Electronic address: [email protected] , (Belgium)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Hearing research
Publication Date
Jul 01, 2020
Volume
392
Pages
107979–107979
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/j.heares.2020.107979
PMID: 32447097
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

The envelope following response (EFR) has been proposed as a non-invasive marker of synaptopathy in animal models. However, its amplitude is affected by the spread of basilar-membrane excitation and other coexisting sensorineural hearing deficits. This study aims to (i) improve frequency specificity of the EFR by introducing a derived-band EFR (DBEFR) technique and (ii) investigate the effect of lifetime noise exposure, age and outer-hair-cell (OHC) damage on DBEFR magnitudes. Additionally, we adopt a modelling approach to validate the frequency-specificity of the DBEFR and test how different aspects of sensorineural hearing loss affect peripheral generators. The combined analysis of simulations and experimental data proposes that the DBEFRs extracted from the [2-6]-kHz frequency band is a sensitive and frequency-specific measure of synaptopathy in humans. Individual variability in DBEFR magnitudes among listeners with normal audiograms was explained by their self-reported amount of experienced lifetime noise-exposure and corresponded to amplitude variability predicted by synaptopathy. Older listeners consistently had reduced DBEFR magnitudes in comparison to young normal-hearing listeners, in correspondence to how age-induced synaptopathy affects EFRs and compromises temporal envelope encoding. To a lesser degree, OHC damage was also seen to affect the DBEFR magnitude, hence the DBEFR metric should ideally be combined with a sensitive marker of OHC damage to offer a differential diagnosis of synaptopathy in listeners with impaired audiograms. Copyright © 2020 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

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