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Deprivation of dietary fiber in specific-pathogen-free mice promotes susceptibility to the intestinal mucosal pathogen Citrobacter rodentium

Authors
  • Neumann, Mareike1, 2
  • Steimle, Alex1
  • Grant, Erica T.1, 2
  • Wolter, Mathis1, 2
  • Parrish, Amy1, 2
  • Willieme, Stéphanie1
  • Brenner, Dirk1, 3, 4
  • Martens, Eric C.5
  • Desai, Mahesh S.1, 3
  • 1 Luxembourg Institute of Health, Luxembourg , (Luxembourg)
  • 2 University of Luxembourg, Luxembourg , (Luxembourg)
  • 3 Odense University Hospital, University of Southern Denmark, Denmark , (Denmark)
  • 4 Luxembourg Centre for System Biomedicine (Lcsb), University of Luxembourg, Luxembourg , (Luxembourg)
  • 5 University of Michigan Medical School, USA
Type
Published Article
Journal
Gut Microbes
Publisher
Landes Bioscience
Publication Date
Sep 16, 2021
Volume
13
Issue
1
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1080/19490976.2021.1966263
PMID: 34530674
PMCID: PMC8451455
Source
PubMed Central
Keywords
Disciplines
  • Research Paper
License
Unknown

Abstract

The change of dietary habits in Western societies, including reduced consumption of fiber, is linked to alterations in gut microbial ecology. Nevertheless, mechanistic connections between diet-induced microbiota changes that affect colonization resistance and enteric pathogen susceptibility are still emerging. We sought to investigate how a diet devoid of soluble plant fibers impacts the structure and function of a conventional gut microbiota in specific-pathogen-free (SPF) mice and how such changes alter susceptibility to a rodent enteric pathogen. We show that absence of dietary fiber intake leads to shifts in the abundances of specific taxa, microbiome-mediated erosion of the colonic mucus barrier, a reduction of intestinal barrier-promoting short-chain fatty acids, and increases in markers of mucosal barrier integrity disruption. Importantly, our results highlight that these low-fiber diet-induced changes in the gut microbial ecology collectively contribute to a lethal colitis by the mucosal pathogen Citrobacter rodentium , which is used as a mouse model for enteropathogenic and enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EPEC and EHEC, respectively). Our study indicates that modern, low-fiber Western-style diets might make individuals more prone to infection by enteric pathogens via the disruption of mucosal barrier integrity by diet-driven changes in the gut microbiota, illustrating possible implications for EPEC and EHEC infections.

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