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Depression and parenting in youth with type 1 diabetes: Are general and diabetes-specific parenting behaviors associated with depressive symptoms over a 2-year period?

Authors
  • Dempster, Katherine W1
  • Liu, Aiyi1
  • Nansel, Tonja R2
  • 1 Division of Intramural Population Health Research, Social and Behavioral Sciences Branch (KWD, TRN), Biostatistics and Bioinformatics Branch (AL), Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Bethesda, MD, USA.
  • 2 Division of Intramural Population Health Research, Social and Behavioral Sciences Branch (KWD, TRN), Biostatistics and Bioinformatics Branch (AL), Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Bethesda, MD, USA. [email protected]
Type
Published Article
Journal
Journal of behavioral medicine
Publication Date
Oct 01, 2019
Volume
42
Issue
5
Pages
842–850
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1007/s10865-019-00011-w
PMID: 30694403
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

To examine cross-sectional and longitudinal associations of general parenting style and diabetes-specific parenting behaviors with depression in youth with type 1 diabetes. Participants (n = 390) completed self-report measures of depression at baseline and 2-year follow-up, general parenting style at baseline, and diabetes-specific parenting (conflict, task involvement, and collaborative involvement) at baseline and every 6 months. Logistic regression examined associations of parenting with depression at baseline and 2-year follow-up. A less authoritative parenting style, lower parent collaborative involvement, and greater diabetes-related conflict were associated with baseline depression in the model simultaneously including all parenting variables and covariates. Lower parent collaborative involvement and higher diabetes-related conflict were associated with depression at 2-year follow-up, adjusting for baseline depression and covariates. Parent task involvement was not associated with depression at either time. Findings suggest a protective role of parenting in reducing the risk of depression in youth with type 1 diabetes.

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