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Dendritic Spines: Mediators of Cognitive Resilience in Aging and Alzheimer's Disease.

Authors
  • Walker, Courtney K1
  • Herskowitz, Jeremy H1
  • 1 Department of Neurology, Center for Neurodegeneration and Experimental Therapeutics, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL, USA.
Type
Published Article
Journal
The Neuroscientist
Publisher
SAGE Publications
Publication Date
Oct 01, 2021
Volume
27
Issue
5
Pages
487–505
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1177/1073858420945964
PMID: 32812494
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Cognitive resilience is often defined as the ability to remain cognitively normal in the face of insults to the brain. These insults can include disease pathology, such as plaques and tangles associated with Alzheimer's disease, stroke, traumatic brain injury, or other lesions. Factors such as physical or mental activity and genetics may contribute to cognitive resilience, but the neurobiological underpinnings remain ill-defined. Emerging evidence suggests that dendritic spine structural plasticity is one plausible mechanism. In this review, we highlight the basic structure and function of dendritic spines and discuss how spine density and morphology change in aging and Alzheimer's disease. We note evidence that spine plasticity mediates resilience to stress, and we tackle dendritic spines in the context of cognitive resilience to Alzheimer's disease. Finally, we examine how lifestyle and genetic factors may influence dendritic spine plasticity to promote cognitive resilience before discussing evidence for actin regulatory kinases as therapeutic targets for Alzheimer's disease.

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