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Effect of Manganese on the Strength-Toughness Relationship of Low-Carbon Copper and Nickel-Containing Hull Steel.

Authors
  • Zhan, Zhide1, 2
  • Shi, Zhongran2
  • Wang, Zemin1
  • Lu, Wenjing1
  • Chen, Zuoning2, 3
  • Zhang, Dian2
  • Chai, Feng2
  • Luo, Xiaobing2
  • 1 School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai Institute of Technology, 100 Haiquan Road, Shanghai 201418, China. , (China)
  • 2 Institute of Structural Steels, Central Iron and Steel Research Institute, Beijing 100081, China. , (China)
  • 3 The State Key Laboratory of Refractories and M1, The State Key Laboratory of Refractories and Metallurgy, Wuhan University of Science and Technology, China Metallurgy, Wuhan 430081, China. , (China)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Materials
Publisher
MDPI AG
Publication Date
Feb 22, 2024
Volume
17
Issue
5
Identifiers
DOI: 10.3390/ma17051012
PMID: 38473484
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

The influence of varying the manganese (Mn) contents of high-strength copper-containing hull steel on its microstructural evolution and mechanical properties was investigated. With increasing Mn content from 2 to 5%, the tensile strength of the steel increased by ~100 MPa, while the elongation of steel remained at ~23.5%, indicating good plasticity. However, the 2Mn sample had 128 J higher low-temperature (-84 °C) impact work than the 5Mn sample. The microstructures of different Mn steels were composed of fresh martensite (FM), ferrite/tempered martensite (F/TM), and reversed austenite (RA). The increase in Mn content markedly increased the presence of RA and intensified the work hardening caused by the transformation-induced plasticity (TRIP) effect during the tensile process. However, as the phase transformation in different Mn steels occurred in the early stage of strain and did not extend throughout the entire plastic deformation process, increasing plasticity via phase transformation was difficult. In addition, although the volume fraction of RA increased significantly in 4Mn and 5Mn steels, the stability of RA significantly decreased. The presence of numerous metastable blocks and coarse lath-like RA contributed little to low-temperature impact work and was even detrimental to toughness. The substantial fresh martensite resulting from phase transformation facilitated microcrack generation, owing to rapid volume expansion and mutual impacts, thus reducing the work required for crack formation. Additionally, the abundance of deformation twins significantly reduced the work needed for crack propagation. These combined actions significantly reduced the low-temperature toughness of 4Mn and 5Mn steels.

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