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Delayed traumatic intracerebral hemorrhage: a study of prognostic factors.

Authors
Type
Published Article
Journal
Journal of the Formosan Medical Association = Taiwan yi zhi
Publication Date
Volume
91
Issue
6
Pages
585–589
Identifiers
PMID: 1358343
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

Experience in the management of 32 patients with delayed traumatic intracerebral hemorrhage (DTICH) is presented with emphasis on the incidence, clinical significance and factors affecting the outcome. The incidence was 1.4% of all hospitalized head-injury patients, or 5.9% of only those patients with neurologic signs or abnormal findings on computed tomography (CT) identified on admission. After an injury, every patient had an immediate CT scan to diagnose intracranial pathology. Initially, nine patients underwent a craniotomy for intracranial hematomas, and 23 patients had nonoperative treatment. CT follow-up was carried out in 10 patients due to clinical deterioration and on 22 patients due to failure to recover neurologically. The delayed hemorrhage was found after a time interval varying from seven hours to 10 days (average, three days and seven hours). Six patients underwent operations for DTICH, and 26 were treated conservatively. Twenty-four patients (75%) were functional (good or moderately disabled condition) after one year of follow-up treatment, as measured on the Glasgow Outcome Scale. The mortality was 16%. The patients were predicted to have a poor prognosis if associated with an earlier occurrence, the hematoma was large, the patient had a poor Glasgow Coma Scale score at the time of CT follow-up, clinical deterioration was noted, or partial or complete effacement of the suprachiasmatic cistern was noted on the CT scan. The results indicate that the prognosis of DTICH is not as poor as it was previously thought to be, and the factors affecting the outcome in this study seem to justify a more vigilant approach.

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