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Deep Brain Stimulation

Authors
  • Shamir, Reuben R.1
  • Noecker, Angela1
  • McIntyre, Cameron C.1
  • 1 Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH
Type
Published Article
Journal
Frontiers for Young Minds
Publisher
Frontiers Media SA
Publication Date
Apr 24, 2014
Volume
2
Identifiers
DOI: 10.3389/frym.2014.00012
Source
Frontiers
Disciplines
  • Neuroscience
  • Core Concept
License
Green

Abstract

Some patients with neurological diseases (e.g., a disease that involves abnormal brain function) do not respond well to the available medications and must resort to alternative surgical therapies to manage their symptoms. Parkinson's disease (PD), for example, involves damage to a specific brain area called the basal ganglia and is characterized by reduced levels of a substance called dopamine in the brain. These changes to the brain physiology are associated with motor symptoms like imbalance, tremor, and slowness of motion, which can be very disabling. Fortunately, medications like levodopa can partially return the balance of dopamine in the brain and relieve the motor symptoms of the disease, especially in its early stages. However, as PD progresses, the drug therapy becomes less and less effective, and an additional therapy is needed.

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