Affordable Access

Decreased protein Z concentrations complicating the hypercoagulable state of Behçet's disease.

Authors
  • Oztürk, M Akif
  • Ozbalkan, Zeynep
  • Onat, A Mesut
  • Ertenli, Ihsan
  • Kiraz, Sedat
  • Aytemir, Kudret
  • Ureten, Kemal
  • Abali, Gülcan
  • Calgüneri, Meral
  • Kirazli, Serafettin
  • Haznedaroglu, Ibrahim C
Type
Published Article
Journal
Clinical and applied thrombosis/hemostasis : official journal of the International Academy of Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis
Publication Date
Jul 01, 2003
Volume
9
Issue
3
Pages
259–263
Identifiers
PMID: 14507116
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

Protein Z is a vitamin-K-dependent plasma protein that serves as a cofactor for the inhibition of factor Xa. Although the precise physiologic function of protein Z is still unknown, abnormal plasma protein Z concentrations have been associated with a number of thrombotic disease states. There is the evidence of universal activation of the hemostatic system in Behçet's disease (BD), which represents a hypercoagulable/prothrombotic state. Circulating protein Z levels in patients with BD were evaluated. Plasma protein Z concentrations were assayed in 24 patients with BD (male/female: 13/11, mean age 35.4 years) and in 24 healthy controls (males/females: 14/10, mean age 59.8 years). The disease duration was 10.6 years (range, 1-30 years). None of the subjects in either group had received anticoagulants within 3 weeks before the study, and none of them had liver dysfunction. Patients complicated with vascular disease were also excluded from the study. Mean plasma concentrations of protein Z were 141 ng/mL (range, 56.8-257) in healthy controls and 107.8 ng/mL (range, 21.2-202) in BD patients (p<0.05). There was a positive correlation between the disease duration and protein Z levels in the study group (p<0.05, r=0.448). Alterations of protein Z concentrations could complicate the pathobiology of the prothrombotic state of BD. Furthermore, the tendency of increment in the protein Z with the passage of time may reflect the diminution of the disease activity.

Report this publication

Statistics

Seen <100 times