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Deconstructing One Medical School's Pain Curriculum: II. Partnering with Medical Students on an Evidence-Guided Redesign.

Authors
  • Bradshaw, Ylisabyth S1
  • Patel Wacks, Neha2
  • Perez-Tamayo, Alejandra3
  • Myers, Brenden4
  • Obionwu, Chukwueloka Jr1
  • Lee, Rebecca A1
  • Carr, Daniel B1
  • 1 Department of Public Health and Community Medicine Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.
  • 2 Department of Family Medicine and Community Health University of Massachusetts, Worcester, Massachusetts, USA.
  • 3 Department of Surgery, University of Vermont School of Medicine, Burlington, Vermont, USA.
  • 4 College of Osteopathic Medicine, University of New England, Biddeford, Maine, USA.
Type
Published Article
Journal
Pain medicine (Malden, Mass.)
Publication Date
Apr 01, 2017
Volume
18
Issue
4
Pages
664–679
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1093/pm/pnw340
PMID: 28586443
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

To reshape medical education about pain to present it as a population-based public health process as well as a neuron-centered phenomenon. Collaborate with students to apply a recent inventory of pain-related preclinical curricular content and clinical training in order to modify the current multiyear presentation and offer a broadened social perspective on pain. Appraise fourth-year medical students' pain-related educational needs by surveying their knowledge, attitudes, experience with the curriculum, and self-reported assessment of pain-related competencies. University-affiliated medical school and its fourth-year medical students. Analysis of a detailed inventory of first- and second-year curricula. Survey of graduating medical students assessing attitudes, skills, and confidence. Construction of a fourth-year pain education elective and collaboration with enrollees to better integrate pain throughout the four-year curriculum. This student-faculty collaboration produced an evidence-guided proposal to reorganize pain-related content across the longitudinal medical curriculum. An attitudes/skills/confidence survey of graduating medical students (104 respondents of 200 polled) found that 70% believed chances for successful outcomes treating chronic pain were low. Self-evaluated competency was high for evaluating (82%) and managing (69%) acute pain; for chronic pain, both were lower (evaluating = 38%; managing = 6%). Self-evaluated knowledge of pain physiology and neurobiology was poor (14%), fair (54%), or good (30%), but rarely excellent (2%). To meet graduating students' desire for increased competency in pain, pain-related curricula can and should be reorganized to include pain as a disease state and a widespread public health burden, not merely a symptom. © 2017 American Academy of Pain Medicine. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: [email protected]

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